Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Code of ethics for politicians

We need leaders who champion all races


I refer to the report “Code of ethics to prevent politicians from using racial issues”(Sun July 24).


The plans by The Parliamentary Select Committee on National Unity and National Service to come up with a code of ethics to prevent politicians from using racial issues to gain political mileage is indeed a timely and right move which should be welcome by all.It is very unfortunate that our politicians nned such a code of ethics to restrain them from resorting to racial issues to garner support.


We are at the brink of our 50th anniversary of independence and have elaborate plans to mark this historic occasion.Unfortunately the nation of late has been clouded by a climate of uncertainties especially with regards to racial and religious integration and harmony.


Despite our diverse origins we considered the nation as our motherland and together we shared a common brotherhood, fighting side by side, first the British colonialists and then the communists insurgents. In the spirit of that brotherhood, we together formulated the Federal Constitution which was to be guide for our mutual co-existence of future generations.


Today after 50 years there is growing anxiety that we are losing our grip on this important ingredient of ethnic unity for lasting peace in the country. Day in day out, instead of emphasizing on our commonness, we are reminded of our differences. We are increasingly being divided along ethnic and religious lines so much so our children today are comfortable to work, play and interact within their respective communities.


The vast majority of Malaysians, from all races, are busy with their lives, working hard to make ends meet.The escalating price of commodities like food, petrol and toll together with the increasing cost of housing, health care and education is taking a heavy toll on the average wage earner,especially in urban areas.


In this preoccupation with trying to support their families, they have neither the interest nor time to indulge in activities that are detrimental to national unity. It is the minority who are in places of comfort and luxury who resort to such racial issues to gain popularity and power.


Enacting measures to stop them from doing so will go a long way to arrest the deterioration of the already fragile national unity we have now.


It may be not enough to just formulate a code of ethics for politicians but ensure that it is enforced effectively for all. Our political leaders must set the example for the younger generation. They must educate aspiring young politicians on the importance of racial unity and respect of the traditions and culture of other communities. What better way is there to do this than by being a living example for them?


We have more than enough politicians who are ethnic champions. What our nation needs badly are leaders who champion the needs of all races.


Dr.Chris Anthony

Monday, July 23, 2007

Costly medical education

Exorbitant cost deny many aspiring younsters

I refer to the report “Medical colleges’ high fees surprise MMA”(Star July 23).

Not only the Malaysian Medical Association (MMA, but we all are surprised by the exorbitant fees charged by private medical colleges. This unhealthy practice has been ongoing for so many years and we are rather surprised that the MMA just realized that.

Hospital attachment which is a vital part of the training of a doctor is the most costly aspect of the programme. Currently all the private colleges in the country use existing government hospitals for the purpose of clinical teaching of their medical students.

The charges imposed by the government hospitals appear to be reasonable. It is surprising that most colleges charge more than RM 300,000 for the medical course when the government hospitals only charge less than RM20,000 for using their facilities and specialists for the training of medical students.

A quick survey of the various colleges will show that the cost of medical courses in local colleges that offer local degrees are not much cheaper than foreign degrees awarded by reputable foreign medical colleges. At the same time the tuition fees for foreign degrees that are awarded locally by way of twinning programmes are also not significantly lower than those awarded by the foreign college itself.

This is rather ridiculous, as although the degree may be awarded by a foreign university, the bulk of the training, especially the clinical training, is conducted locally in our own government hospitals and specialists. Twinning programmes should significantly reduce the cost; otherwise it would defeat the purpose of the programme itself.

It may cost about RM300, 000–RM500,000 to do medicine locally. This is a very large amount and beyond the means of the vast majority of our people. How many parents can ever save that amount in their lifetime? Most of them have more than one child and we can imagine the financial burden imposed on them by the children’s education alone.

The high cost had made the medical course to become exclusive for children of very wealthy parents. It must be stressed that many of the best doctors, like in all other professions, come from the masses, the lower and middle income families. It is regrettable that a significant number of them with great passion for the job are automatically eliminated from the medical profession due to their financial handicap.

The government must ensure that those capable and eager youngsters aspiring to become dedicated doctors must to given the opportunity to take up the career in medicine. If the government is not able to absorb them into the public colleges for whatever reasons, then at least they must be aided to secure places at private ones at affordable fees.

We must not let financial restraints deny our passionate young men and women the opportunity of becoming dedicated doctors of the future. If we do, then we would only be doing a great disservice to the nation and the medical profession, that is fast losing its nobility and becoming a business enterprise instead.

Private medical colleges, like all others have an obligation to the nation. They must not just be driven by profit alone but must help to provide the nation with quality and dedicated doctors if we want to realize our aspirations of becoming a regional centre of medical excellence.

Dr.Chris Anthony

Friday, July 20, 2007

Judiciary only hope of the rakyat

Laws must be intepreted to protect the innocent

I refer to the report “Judges rapped for being biased”(NST July 20).

The recent spat between the Federal and Appeals courts which have been highlighted by our national media is an unhealthy development for judicial system of the country. It creates so much confusion in the minds of the people as to who is right and can undermine the confidence of the people in the system.

We are repeatedly lectured that justice must not only be done but it must also be seen to be done. The judiciary must be seen to be consistent in its interpretation of the laws of the country. The laws of a country are enacted to safeguard the rights of the rakyat, however low he may be in the socio-economic ladder, and they must be interpreted to fulfill that purpose and nothing else.

In this context, it is of utmost importance for the judges at all levels to act and behave in a manner appropriate to the highly noble responsibility entrusted upon them, which is to safeguard the rule of law at all costs. The rights and welfare of the rakyat must be the only consideration when they deliberate and deliver their judgments.

The ordinary man on the street has nowhere to turn to for justice except the judiciary and if the institution, that is established to grant him justice fails, it would be a great tragedy not only to the person who seeks fair play but also the institution itself.

Dr.Chris Anthony

Monday, July 16, 2007

Decline in football self-inflicted

Commercialization and politicization cause of decline

I refer to the report “Tengku Abdullah quits as FAM deputy president”(Star July 16).

The Tengku Mahkota of Pahang, Tengku Abdullah Sultan Ahmad Shah’s decision to quit as deputy president of the Football Association of Malaysia (FAM) to make way for new blood is an honorable gesture on his part. This shows that he has put the interest of football fans above his own. His willingness to apologise to every spectator only shows his magnanimity.

Malaysians in general and footfall fans in particular are deeply disappointed with the dismal performance of the national team in the on-going Asian Cup, which the country is co-hosting. We have been thrashed by teams like China and Uzbekistan who are rather new comers in international soccer scene.

The FAM should take collective responsibility for the debacle in the current Asian Cup . The whole committee should follow Tengku Abdullah’s footsteps and make way for new people to take over so that they can bring necessary new changes for the good of football in the country.

There is no doubt that the standard of football has been deteriorating over these years. From being an Asian power in the sixties we have been reduced, or rather reduced ourselves, to a shameful position in the most popular sport in the world. Countries which were unknown entities then have overtaken us to levels beyond our reach. We are now far behind Thailand, Singapore and Indonesia. Where have we gone wrong?

The two main causes of our continuing failure are politicization and commercialization of football and sports in general. Like in all the fields sports too is being seen as money spinning enterprise where professionalism, quality, national pride and ethics of the game take a back stage compared to monetary gains.

Politicization of football has resulted in favouritism rather than merit being the more important criteria in the selection of players and officials. There is general skepticism on whether the best get selected to represent the nation.

We have been focusing on the building of sophisticated sports complexes to host the various international tournaments. In fact we have gained a reputation internationally as good and efficient organizers of these tournaments. In that enthusiasm we have missed the main target that is to develop the sport among our own youth who have likewise become good spectators.

Despite its popularity, football in one of the cheapest games, that is affordable by the masses even in poor countries. All that is needed is a field that is a permanent one time investment, a ball and a pair of boots. Unfortunately playing fields which were easily and freely available to our youth during the sixties and seventies when we were an Asian football giant are hard to come by these days.

Development has taken heavy toll on football by eliminating all available fields. They have been replaced with magnificent mega structures, shopping complexes and stadiums especially in the major towns and cities. This in turn has transformed our youth from being active players to active spectators of football being hosted in the various modern stadiums. In the final outcome it is the organizers who stand to be the gainers, reaping huge profits from hosting the various tournaments. Commercialization of the sport had dealt a great blow to its development.

We do not need sophisticated and high-tech sports complexes as they are beyond the means of the vast majority of our youths. The single most important means of developing football is to take the game to the masses all over the country. Playing fields must be made available to them freely in schools and districts all over. Selection of the players must be solely on merit not on favoritism. Officials well qualified in the game should be selected and given the freedom to manage the teams more professionally without undue interference.

We have the money and the talent, all we need is the will to get dedicated and loyal officials, managers and coaches who are genuinely interested to bring honor and glory, not for them but, for the nation. Until we find these leaders, which appears to be a formidable task, we have to be contended being mere spectators, at the most organizers, of international football tournaments. In the meantime our aspirations of qualifying for the FIFA World Cup finals will only be a dream.

Dr.Chris Anthony

Friday, July 13, 2007

Forging unity is our duty and obligation

I refer to your report “Unity must prevail for continued peace and a safe Malaysia” (NST,July 12).

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi’s advice to the newly appointed members of the National Unity Advisory Panel should be taken seriously by Malaysians of all ethnicity especially political and government leaders at all levels.

The PM rightly stressed that the only way to perpetuate unity was for Malaysians of all races and religions to be involved in every aspect of Malaysian life. They must be together in politics, in government, in school. That’s the way it was (when Malaysia was formed) and that’s the way it should be.

Yes, unity is the key to our success as a nation. It is sad that after fifty years we are still engaged in vigorous debate about national unity. There is a general perception that this all important unity is slipping our grip by the day and that is creating a lot of anxiety and fear among us all.

As the PM said the only way to forge and maintain this unity is for all races to be together in all facets of Malaysian life. But the opportunities of being together are slowly but surely decreasing and the various communities are increasingly segregated so much so that now we are happy to just work within and for our own community.

I am afraid our children today are losing the ability to interact effectively and freely among the various races due to suspicion for each other.They are fast losing the skills and ability of inter-racial communication which was came so naturally to our forefathers. They, despite having lived in the same country for years, appear to be separated by barriers that are becoming increasingly more insurmountable – language, religion and culture. Within just fifty years, cultures of fellow Malaysians have become alien to others of different faiths and ethnicity.

Unity in a country with diverse cultures like ours can only be achieved if everyone is treated equally. Only this would rid us of the suspicion and hate for one another. Every citizen should be free to enjoy the fruits of freedom obtained from our independence as enshrined in the Federal Constitution. The poor and deserving from all communities should be granted the benefits due to them without favour.

There must be equal representation of the various communities in all sectors, government, schools, armed forces and business enterprises. Those with capabilities and talents must be given the opportunities purely based on merit. Those with a burning desire to serve the nation must be given the opportunity to do so without any impediment.

There is a dire need to increase the participation of minority groups in the various arms of the civil service. A racially balanced mixture of the all the communities in the various services would go a long way to erase the suspicion and ill-feeling for each other and thereby promote mutual interaction and unity among the various races in the country.
How can inter-communal unity be achieved when all sectors are dominated by a particular group?

Let’s heed our PM’s call to actively promote racial unity in our country. It is not just our duty but a sacred obligation as well. Our nation has enough for all so let us not deprive any particular community of its rights to the stake in the fortunes of the nation. Unity must prevail at all costs for continued and lasting peace and a safe and prosperous Malaysia.

Malaysia is known as a country that could manage race relations well. We must not allow this reputation to be shattered by those with myopic and skewed ideas and who are bent on dividing the country on ethnic lines for their own selfish needs. This would only bring disaster to all in the final outcome.

Let’s pray for capable and far-sighted leaders who champion the interests not just of their own race but that of all Malaysians.

Dr.Chris Anthony

Thursday, July 12, 2007

National Service - response from DG

Wednesday July 11 2007

Act against poorly managed NS camps

I REFER to the report 'NS to close cash-strapped camps' (Sunday Star July 8).

The decision to close cash-strapped National Service (NS) training camps is the right move for the well-being of the trainees.

According to the Defence Ministry Secretary-General Datuk Seri Ahmad Latiffi Hashim, the payments to the NS camp operators were adequate and yet these operators were unable to run the facilities satisfactorily.

This is a very serious problem, and the government should immediately look into it and take remedial measures.

If the operators are not able to provide the facilities as stipulated, due to their own incompetence, how can we entrust the safety of our children to them? This is the question that lingers in the minds of all parents.

The NS programme appears to be riddled with all sorts of problems from the very beginning. Despite reassurances by various quarters, we still witness major setbacks that emerge from time to time.

They may be logistic, but all of them are due to sheer incompetence and complacency of those who were tasked to do the job.

After four years we are still plagued by numerous problems.
Millions of ringgit have been spent and a number of lives have been lost in the programme. If the problems that plague the NS cannot be overcome, then it is only logical that the scheme is scrapped.

DR CHRIS ANTHONY,
Butterworth.


Comment 1

Thursday July 12, 2007

Give NS programme a fair chance

I REFER to the letter 'Act against poorly managed National Service Camps' (The Star, July 11) by Dr Chris Anthony.

In response to a report 'National Service to close cash-strapped camps' (Sunday Star, July 8) the writer commented that the Government should act against poorly managed camps.

While the writer’s concern over the matter is appreciated, it is unfortunate that he has over-reacted by making assumptions that the National Service Programme is ‘riddled with all sorts of problems’ and that nothing has been done to address these problems.

To be fair, to the National Service Training Department has taken various measures to improve the programme since its implementation.

The director-general of the National Service Department and the National Service Training Council, headed by Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye, have worked hard to introduce several improvements to the programme.

Among the changes inlcude the provision of better medical facilities, adjustment to the physical training modules taking into account the health of the trainees, better insurance coverage, strengthening management of all camps with emphasis on quality trainers and recruitment of more competent camp commandants, etc.

The Defence Ministry is also acting against errant and irresponsible camp operators.
Dr Anthony should have taken note of all these improvements instead of assuming that nothing had been done to address the various problems.

It does not make sense for him to call for the programme to be scrapped when more than 90% of trainees and their parents have admitted that they benefited from the programme in many ways.

Considering the huge number of trainees, about 100,000, and with about 3,000 trainers and 80 camp commandants, it is unrealistic to expect all the camps to be 100% problem-free.

But what is important is that the department and the council are sensitive to all complaints and are taking action to overcome them one at a time and have set targets to work towards problem-free camps.

My final word is that the department director-general and chairman of the National Service Training Council are doing a great job under very trying circumstances.

They should be given all the encouragement to ensure the successful implementation of the National Service Training Programme.

PARENT,

Cheras, Selangor.


Comment 2

Friday July 13, 2007

Well-being of NS trainees top priority

NATIONAL Service Training Department (NSTD) would like to respond to the letter “Act against poorly managed NS camps” (The Star, July 11).

The NSTD certainly has made improvements to resolve some of the common complaints by trainees, parents and guardians.
One obvious proactive measure taken was the decision to closely monitor cash-strapped NSTD camps to prevent any unwanted incidents and to safeguard the well-being of trainees.

The NSTD has also made it compulsory for trainees to fill a medical declaration form so that should there be any health problems declared, the trainees will have to undergo a medical examination before the commencement of each training programme.

This is to prevent medical problems during the training programme.
The NSTD wants parents not to worry because the safety and welfare of the trainees are its highest priority.

Currently, constant improvements are taken by the department to ensure that the three-month training programme is safe and comfortable for the trainees.
Therefore, the suggestion of the writer to scrap the national programme is inappropriate.

ABDUL HADI AWANG KECHIL,
Director General National National Service Training Department.












National Service (NS)

NS, no end to its problems

I refer to the report “NS to close cash-strapped camps” (Sunday Star July 8).

The decision to close Cash-strapped National Service (NS) training camps is the right move for the well being of the trainees.

According to the Defence Ministry Secretary-General Datuk Seri Ahmad Latiffi Hashim,the payments to the NS camp operators were adequate and yet these operators are unable to run these facilities satisfactorily.

This is a very serious problem that the government should immediately look into and take remedial measures. Failing to that will only go to convince the parents of the trainees that the NS should be scrapped altogether.

Despite adequate financial allocation, if the operators are not able to provide the facilities as stipulated, due to their own incompetence, how can we entrust the safety of our children to them? This is the question that lingers in the minds of all parents.

The NS programme appears to be riddled with all sorts of problems from the very beginning. Despite reassurances by various quarters we still witness major setbacks that emerge from time to time. They may be logistic but all of them are due to sheer incompetence and complacency of those who were tasked to do the job.

The NS programme was aimed at promoting comradeship and racial integration among your younger generation. After four years into the scheme we are still plagued by numerous problems and it appears we are not capable of overcoming them. It is timely now to re-look at the scheme to see its necessity and effectiveness in fulfilling its noble aims with minimal risks to the trainees.

Millions of ringgit has been spent and a number of lives have been lost in the NS programme. If the problems that plague the NS cannot be overcome then it is only logical that the scheme itself should be scrapped.

Dr.Chris Anthony

Act Against poorly managed NS camps

The Star
Wednesday July 11, 2007

Act against poorly managed NS camps

I REFER to the report 'NS to close cash-strapped camps' (Sunday Star July 8).

The decision to close cash-strapped National Service (NS) training camps is the right move for the well-being of the trainees.

According to the Defence Ministry Secretary-General Datuk Seri Ahmad Latiffi Hashim, the payments to the NS camp operators were adequate and yet these operators were unable to run the facilities satisfactorily.

This is a very serious problem, and the government should immediately look into it and take remedial measures.

If the operators are not able to provide the facilities as stipulated, due to their own incompetence, how can we entrust the safety of our children to them? This is the question that lingers in the minds of all parents.

The NS programme appears to be riddled with all sorts of problems from the very beginning. Despite reassurances by various quarters, we still witness major setbacks that emerge from time to time.

They may be logistic, but all of them are due to sheer incompetence and complacency of those who were tasked to do the job.

After four years we are still plagued by numerous problems.

Millions of ringgit have been spent and a number of lives have been lost in the programme. If the problems that plague the NS cannot be overcome, then it is only logical that the scheme is scrapped.

DR CHRIS ANTHONY,
Butterworth.

© 1995-2005 Star Publications (Malaysia) Bhd (Co No 10894-D)


Comments

The Star
Thursday July 12, 2007

Give NS programme a fair chance

I REFER to the letter 'Act against poorly managed National Service Camps' (The Star, July 11) by Dr Chris Anthony.

In response to a report 'National Service to close cash-strapped camps' (Sunday Star, July 8) the writer commented that the Government should act against poorly managed camps.

While the writer’s concern over the matter is appreciated, it is unfortunate that he has over-reacted by making assumptions that the National Service Programme is ‘riddled with all sorts of problems’ and that nothing has been done to address these problems.

To be fair, to the National Service Training Department has taken various measures to improve the programme since its implementation.

The director-general of the National Service Department and the National Service Training Council, headed by Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye, have worked hard to introduce several improvements to the programme.

Among the changes inlcude the provision of better medical facilities, adjustment to the physical training modules taking into account the health of the trainees, better insurance coverage, strengthening management of all camps with emphasis on quality trainers and recruitment of more competent camp commandants, etc.

The Defence Ministry is also acting against errant and irresponsible camp operators.
Dr Anthony should have taken note of all these improvements instead of assuming that nothing had been done to address the various problems.

It does not make sense for him to call for the programme to be scrapped when more than 90% of trainees and their parents have admitted that they benefited from the programme in many ways.

Considering the huge number of trainees, about 100,000, and with about 3,000 trainers and 80 camp commandants, it is unrealistic to expect all the camps to be 100% problem-free.
But what is important is that the department and the council are sensitive to all complaints and are taking action to overcome them one at a time and have set targets to work towards problem-free camps.

My final word is that the department director-general and chairman of the National Service Training Council are doing a great job under very trying circumstances.
They should be given all the encouragement to ensure the successful implementation of the National Service Training Programme.

PARENT,
Cheras, Selangor.

Friday, July 06, 2007

National Education Blueprint

National Education Blueprint – Let’s produce smart teachers

I refer to the report “A quarter of projects resolved” (Star July 4).

In the first progress report on the National Education Blueprint 2006-2010, Education Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Tun Hussein proudly announced that More than 27% or 4,639 education-related infrastructure projects under the Ninth Malaysia Plan (9MP) have either been completed or are being implemented and the other 12,096 projects were at the planning stage.

It is encouraging that the government has taken great pains to improve the education system by allocating a huge sum of RM23bil for the various development projects to upgrade our schools.The Minister’s plans to give priority to rural schools should also be commended.

The highlights of the plan as revealed are 1.Narrowing the education gap 2.accelerating education excellence 3.Making schools smart and ICT initiatives 4.Strengthning the teaching profession and 5.Developing the human capital.

While all these are ideals and need our support for their success, we should not overlook the single most important factor that is vital for producing students with the right values, knowledge and skills that would make them not just successful but useful citizens in the future.This is the only way to rid of all the ills that plague our nation today.

This factor is the teacher-student relationship. The role of the teacher on the ground is the most important factor that contributes to the success of our education. Every effort should be made to cultivate a healthy teacher-student relationship as this is the basic unit for character building in our young school children.

We may spend billions of ringgit to build modern state of art schools. We may be able to equip them with all the sophisticated gadgets and facilities but if we do not have the proper teacher-student interaction, all our efforts will go to waste.

To cultivate such a favourable relationship between teachers and students we need teachers with a more professional attitude to their job, based on ethics and not sentiments and emotions. Apart from parents, the teacher is the next most important person who has the opportunity to develop and mold the character of our children, who are in their custody from a very young age.

Our children today are plagued with numerous problems – indiscipline, drug abuse, disrespect for elders and authority, truancy,Mat Rempit,violent behaviour,immoral and promiscuous activities. Most of these vicious behaviour have their origin in an uncaring and indifferent attitude of teachers towards their students, resulting in a poor teacher-student relationship. It is not uncommon these days for students to be absent from school for days at a stretch without being noticed by the teacher.

I still remember as children in the sixties and seventies, there were many teachers whom we idolized. We admired the way they carried out their duties impartially and the great passion they had in teaching and guiding us. Many among us opted to be teachers ourselves because of their exemplary behavior. It is a great pity that our children today hardly have teachers whom they can look up to as role models.

I agree times have changed and life has become more materialistic. We have succeeded in developing the nation to great heights physically. Sadly instead of holding steadfast to cherished values and principles, we have lost them all in the name of development and nation building.

It is time to re-examine the basic functional unit of our education system – the attitude and performance of our teachers in their interaction with their pupils. Let us look at it rationally and recognize the flaws therein and take appropriate steps to remedy it.

What we are in dire need is not excellent and sophisticated infrastructure in the form of smart schools, vision schools or cluster schools but rather SMART teachers and headmasters to guide our children.

Dr.Chris Anthony

 

Thursday, July 05, 2007

Labs has obligation to educate the public

Avoiding unnecessary lab tests

I refer to the report “MMA lauds law on labs” (Star July 2).

The Malaysian Medical Association(MMA) has every reason to applaud the Pathology Laboratory Bill which was passed recently to control pathology labs in the country. It fact this wise move is long overdue. If enforced properly, it will not only check the haphazard mushrooming of such labs throughout the country but would also ensure certain degree of quality of the results of the various tests offered.

It would go a long way to minimize the over commercialization of the medical investigations and in the long run benefit the patient by reducing the amount spent on these often unnecessary lab tests. In fact the cost of such tests is becoming increasing more exorbitant and beyond the means of many.

Many of these tests are really not necessary and are of little or no help in the diagnosis in those without any symptoms. In fact a false positive test may not only cause unnecessary alarm but also anxiety and confusion to an otherwise normal individual.

The most important aspects in the management of a patient is the clinical examination by a qualified and competent medical practitioner. The provisional diagnosis and plan of further action are based on this clinical examination. All investigations, like x-rays and laboratory tests are ordered based on this examination. The doctor should provide the patient with a logical plan of action to further investigate and derive at the diagnosis.

Patients must be educated to follow these time tested guidelines and not go straight for tests without the consultation of a doctor. It will not only be unwarranted and costly but occasionally detrimental if this important step in the management of a patient is bypassed.

Any experienced doctor will tell you that there is no single investigation that would clinch the diagnosis in the vast majority of patients. In fact all investigations act as guide and supplement the clinical examination to derive at a diagnosis. As doctors we are only too familiar how patients have been subjected to even major surgeries due to over-dependence on a particular positive test.

The pathological laboratories must adhere to certain ethical principles in providing services to the public. They have an obligation to educate the public on the actual facts and limitations of the various investigations they offer. They should refrain from exploiting the patients’ anxieties for the sake of monetary benefits.

Dr.Chris Anthony

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